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Shaw Foundation Distinguished Faculty Lecture Series

 

Happy Money: The Science of Happier Spending

Date: 25th October 2019

Location: SMU Hall

Time: 6:30pm – 8:00pm

Click HERE to register.

Can money buy happiness? Professor Michael Norton certainly thinks so - if you follow five core principles of smarter spending. Michael is the co-author, with Elizabeth Dunn, of the book: Happy Money: The Science of Happier Spending. The book provides five research-based principles designed to help people use their money in happier ways - whether they have a little or a lot of it. The book is full of recent research and examples that range from how individuals gain happiness by choosing "experiences over stuff" to how companies seek to create happier employees or 'happier products' for their customers. Professor Norton will share some of these insights in his talk.

Professor Michael I. Norton
Harold M. Brierley Professor of Business Administration at the Harvard Business School

Michael I. Norton is the Harold M. Brierley Professor of Business Administration at the Harvard Business School. He has studied human behaviour in domains such as love and inequality, time and money, and happiness and grief. He is the co-author – with Elizabeth Dunn – of the book, Happy Money: The Science of Happier Spending. In 2012, he was selected for Wired Magazine’s Smart List as one of “50 People Who Will Change the World” and his TEDx talk, How to Buy Happiness, has been viewed more than 3 million times.

Associate Professor William Tov
Associate Professor of Psychology and Lee Kong Chian Fellow at SMU

William Tov is an Associate Professor of Psychology and Lee Kong Chian Fellow at Singapore Management University. His research focuses on the multilevel processes that underlie well-being. At the macro-level, he is interested in cultural similarities and differences in well-being as well as the societal-level conditions associated with well-being. At the micro-level, he examines daily fluctuations in emotion, satisfaction, and meaning—and how these fluctuations are influenced by positive personality traits, memory, and social interactions. He also examines the expression of emotion on social media and the veracity of such expressions as indicators of well-being. Most recently, he is conducting research on the effects of mindfulness-based exercises on daily emotion regulation and stress. At SMU, he has received recognition for his dedication to teaching excellence and was awarded an innovative teaching award for his development of an app to teach students statistical concepts. He completed his doctorate in social and personality psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His work has been published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, and the Journal of Personality.