Conversation with Ambassador 26 September 2017

For more than 80 years, Austria has been a small state with about 8 million inhabitants in the heart of Europe. However, in cultural terms, it is equipped with a cultural infrastructure of a great power. This antinomy becomes even more evident when you take into account that Vienna, with 1.8 million people, is not just one of many other European middle-sized cities, but internationally acknowledged as one of the world centres of culture.

Most people who attribute to Austria the status of a cultural nation refer to Austria’s rich cultural heritage in all the different areas of culture, ranging from music to the fine arts and from architecture to film. This traditional basis of the country’s cultural wealth is being carefully cultivated and adapted to new forms of expression.

Austria takes good care of its artistic potential and – even in times of financial and economic crisis – sticks with its policy of public support for the arts as a core task of the state. This way, it strongly differs from the cultural policies followed by a lot of other countries, where the private sector is the main sponsor of the arts

  • Ambassador Karin Fichtinger-Grohe

    Ambassador for Austria

    Her Excellency was educated at the University of Vienna and she majored in Political Science and Science of Communication. She has been Ambassador to Singapore since April 2016. She started her working career with MFA, Department for residence affairs and Department for the Middle East and Africa. From 2003- 2005 she became the Directorate for Bilateral and Multilateral Economic Policy and Head of Unit for politico-economic relations with America, Asia, Africa and Australia....   Read More

    Ambassador Karin Fichtinger-Grohe

    Her Excellency was educated at the University of Vienna and she majored in Political Science and Science of Communication. She has been Ambassador to Singapore since April 2016.  She started her working career with MFA, Department for residence affairs and Department for the Middle East and Africa. From 2003- 2005 she became the Directorate for Bilateral and Multilateral Economic Policy and Head of Unit for politico-economic relations with America, Asia, Africa and Australia. In 2013, she became the Deputy Head of Department, Bilateral Relations with EU countries. Later, that year, she was requested to be Head of Unit, European Security Policy. She speaks various languages such as English, French, Italian, Spanish, Dutch and Croatian. She is married with 3 children.